Pro-testing Against Bad Software Quality

6Jul/109

Brothers in Arms, Part 1

The art of making enemies?

I'm pretty sure it's not exactly the best approach around to start your life in the blogosphere (or anywhere, for that matter) by criticizing people, but hey, this blog is about protesting against poor software quality and quality always starts with the people involved (feel free to contradict me on that, I'd love to see someone explain to me why I'm wrong) - their attitudes included - so if a big part of the problem is in the attitudes and mental approaches of the people instead of the methods or techniques used, then that's what I will be protesting against today.

Starting the series...

As stated before, I will be posting a lot about my thoughts and views on what my colleagues in the testing world write in their own blogs and webpages or what I've been discussing with them through one medium or another.

The "honor" for the first post in this series goes to Rob Lambert for his excellent post Don't be a follower, be a tester, which woke a multitude of emotions and thoughts in me. Actually, the post irritated me. Not because I would disagree, but because he's so damn right in what he says. Briefly put: the irritating essence of the post is that the testing world is full of sheep bleating trendy catchphrases that make things sound really nice while actually meaning absolutely nothing (a favorite subject of criticism by Richard Rorty).

What really caught my attention were these three conclusions Rob made, based on the comments to one of his earlier posts:

We should not challenge the best practices of testing
We should not challenge the experts in testing
We should not talk about testing publicly
unless we are an expert or we know the experts.

My immediate first thought, after reading this was: What, exactly, constitutes an expert in testing? How does one become an expert in testing? Added bonus question: How, exactly, would knowing an expert in testing lend more credibility to what I am saying? I'm not the expert in question, am I?

So, how does this becoming-an-expert-in-testing happen? by not challenging the current authority figures? By not trying to come up with something new and/or improved? By not tackling the problems you see and just serenely accepting them (*baah*, said the sheep and continued munching on grass) as a necessary - and unchangeable - part of the world you're living in?

Let me answer that for you: It happens by stirring the hornet's nest, by challenging the consensus. It happens by telling people that they're doing things in an ineffective way, when they are, and then proposing an alternate way. It happens by not just accepting everything that's being force-fed to you without questioning. It happens by making mistakes, learning from them and then coming back stronger and better equipped than before. It happens by acknowledging the fact your thoughts and ideas could be shot down and torn to shreds in public, and still having the courage to present them despite the risk.

In brief: One does not become an expert (in testing) by being an idle spectator. You do it by taking a stand and making it your very own, personal, responsibility to change the way things are done. And that sure as hell won't happen if you don't throw your ideas out there for people to see and have a taste of. Of course, this is just my personal view - your mileage may vary.

Dramatic, I know, but sometimes being an opinionated tester is like the IT-world equivalent of being John Rambo...

As a sidenote: seems I just discovered a defect in WordPress while writing this post. 😛
Sidenote #2: seems I just discovered another defect in WordPress when trying to add more tags to this post (sorry Rob, WordPress refuses to store your name as a tag with Capital First Letters, I'm not trying to be disrespectful here...)