Endings and Beginnings

Like I said on the About:Petteri page, this blog is going to be a professional one (as opposed to a personal one) and will concentrate on software testing (plus agile and lean, which I didn’t mention there), but this very first post is going to be more personal. It will soon be followed by more technical posts, though.

Referring to the title, endings often mean new beginnings. In this case the ending was on the personal side of life, while the new beginning is on the professional side of life. And a good change it was, too, since for the last few weeks my head has been so full of (technical) thoughts and ideas that I feel like it’s going to burst if I don’t get them out. This blog is a result of that change and will be just the place for getting it all out. Hopefully, to someone’s benefit.

How did I end up in testing?

I’ve always seemed to possess the ability of doing the unexpected which has resulted, among other things, in my grandmother’s clock radio going completely haywire when I was like 7 and simply decided to see what happens if I press certain two buttons at the same time. It has also slowly, but steadily prepared me for a career in (software) testing and, now that after few years of trying it out I’ve realized my potential in the field, it’s also a strong driving factor for me and one of the root causes of my passion for testing. I want to help make things right in the IT world. I will not succumb to poor quality software for as long as there’s something I can do about it. The name (and slogan) of this blog are no coincidence.

Sure, my chances of having an effect may be miniscule, all in all, but I’m a big fan of chaos theory (ever heard of the butterfly effect?) and that alone is reason enough to keep me going. Maybe I’m building castles in the air here, but my response (well, actually, I think it’s an old Spanish proverb, but quick googling didn’t reveal anything so I’m not sure) to that is: “If you don’t build castles in the air, you don’t build any castles”. You need something to strive for – a destination or a goal. It doesn’t have to be achievable, as long as it gives you direction, and that’s exactly what’s happening here.

Based on all of the above, I have finally truly awakened in this business of testing, and I can not get enough of it. I’m reading books about it like crazy. I’m following just about every tester blog I’ve come across so far (James Bach, Michael Bolton, Matthew Heusser, Markus Gärtner, “Michael the Explorer“, just to name a couple), and I’m more than eager to take up any challenges you people out there might have in store. Even if I can’t guarantee good results (as I might simply not be good enough if the challenge is a difficult one) I can guarantee a result. Bring it on!

And that just about covers everything I wanted to say in this post. Stay tuned as more technical writings will be added soon enough!

P.S. I would like to thank Markus Gärtner for encouraging me to start writing the blog – his comments were the deciding factor (after years of deliberation of doing it) that eventually led to this.

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5 Responses to Endings and Beginnings

  1. Congratulations to your first blog entry, Petteri. Based on the discussions we had, I’m really looking forward to your professional ideas here. Keep it up.

  2. Welcome to the testing blogosphere! Markus did a good thing in encouraging you; the more insightful tester blogs, the better! With regards to not guaranteeing good results: good! I’m always a bit suspicious of people that do “guarantee” good results. Context, context…
    Regards,
    Zeger

  3. Hello Petteri!

    I know how it feels to make this first step (I’m not too far removed from it myself 🙂 ). Great to see your comments and thoughts in action, and I look forward to more of your insights. Welcome!!!

  4. Petteri says:

    Thank you all, I’m positively surprised by the amount of comments received so soon. 🙂

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